Batu Caves

Batu Caves is a an iconic and popular tourist attraction in Selangor.

Site of a Hindu temple and shrine, Batu Caves attracts thousands of worshippers and tourists, especially during the annual Hindu festival, Thaipusam.
A limestone outcrop located just north of Kuala Lumpur, Batu Caves has three main caves featuring temples and Hindu shrines.

Its main attraction is the large statue of the Hindu God at the entrance, besides a steep 272 climb up its steps to finally view the stunning skyline of the city centre.

Monkeys frolic around the caves, and it is a popular spot for rock climbing enthusiasts. Paintings and scenes of Hindu Gods can also be seen in the Ramayana Cave.
Batu Caves is a place where you should not miss on your next visit to Malaysia.

Blue Mosque

The Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Shah Mosque in Shah Alam is one of the most stunning structures in the country. Commonly referred to as the ‘Blue Mosque’, it boasts the tallest minarets in the world. As visitors approach the mosque, the awe-inspiring blue dome welcomes them.

Decorative Islamic calligraphy dominates the edges surrounding the dome and main prayer hall, while the interior architecture exhibits ethnic Malay design elements. Sunlight filtering through the blue stained glass of the mosque renders a bluish ambience to its interior, evoking a sense of peace and serenity.

The Blue Mosque overlooks the Garden of Islamic Arts, a beautifully landscaped park inspired by the Quranic Garden of Paradise. Covering 14 hectares, this spiritual sanctuary houses nine galleries that exhibit a rich array of Islamic arts such as calligraphy, sculptures, paintings and architecture. Occasionally, traditional Islamic performances are held here.

Carey Island

Carey Island is famous for two things – great seafood and the indigenous Mah Meri (pronounced Mak Miri) people who have a reputation for some of the world’s finest wooden masks.

Located just off the mainland, they have assimilated into modern life, with jobs in the nearby plantations and farms, but they retain their unique culture and way of life. Apart from exhibitions of their traditional dances and music, the Mah Meri are also known for their evocative sculptures, fashioned from a kind of swamp hardwood known as “Nyireh Batu”.

Forest Research Institute of Malaysia (FRIM)

FRIM offers a back-to-nature experience and the remains of an old Orang Asli settlement. The waterfall and river cutting through this forest reserve adds serenity to this luxurious landscape.

There are four jungle tracks: Keruing Trail, Rover Track, Engkabang Trail and Salleh Trail, all of which will take visitors through some spectacular secondary jungle.

The Canopy Walk, which is located 30m above the ground, offers the perfect vantage point from which to observe birds and tropical canopy flora. Those interested in experiencing the canopy walk should make prior arrangement because the number of people allowed on the canopy walk per day, is limited to 250 people.

At FRIM, camping is available for those wanting to experience a night in the wilderness but prior permission is required.

High 5 Bread Town Museum

High 5 is the largest stand-alone baking plant in South-East Asia. High 5 Bread Town is an attraction which caters to visitors of all ages, promising a time of fun, excitement and learning for the whole family. From watching the video, the children will learnt that the Egyptians were believed to be the first people to make bread some 5,000 years ago.

Everyone also got to see the larger-than-life bread-making equipment like mixers and ovens. The fragrant smell of yeast and fresh bread straight from the oven permeated the factory. The highlight was definitely the suspended factory skywalk at a height of 293m above ground. The skywalk is built like a corridor passageway framed with glass allowing for an expansive view of the bread-making process.

They will see how the dough was first mixed before it went into the divider and rounder (to shape the dough), right down to dough riser and fermentation, the cooling tower, slicing process, and lastly packaged through automated state-of-the-art technology.

i-City

i-City located in Shah Alam, Selangor is known as the city of digital lights. It is recognised at the first lightscape tourism destination in Malaysia with state-of- the-art LED technology showcase.

The digital city includes trendy shopping streets and equipped with a theme park to cater to visitors’ looking for a place to unwind.

The township accommodates high-tech infrastructure allowing for a unique display of digital lights. These attractions are located at CityPark and CityWalk.

You can chill in the park, view the wonderful sculptures and experience a whole new world with its dazzling light showcase. It is ideal for the whole family.
Do bring a camera to capture the wonderful and majestic light displays. It is truly magical!

Selangor Tropical Fruits Garden

The farm has captured the attention of the Prime Minister who is keen to see for himself the progress of the “golden valley”.
The starfruit farm has about 17,000 trees with the favourite B10 type having an internal rate of return (IRR) of 63 percent a year for every invested ringgit and this is the highest percentage returns compared with other fruits there.

Besides the starfruit, the papaya is among the largest cultivated fruit with a sizeable area on a 85-ha farm with about 135,000 trees. This was followed by pineapple and honey lemon, each 42 percent, jackfruit 27 percent, guava 25 percent and mango 20 percent.

Sepang International Circuit

In step with the global rise in interest in motor sports, Malaysia now has a challenging Formula 1 circuit just outside the KL International Airport (KLIA) in Sepang.

The Sepang F1 Circuit has a double-frontage grand stand for 30,000 spectators and natural stands that are able to accommodate 100,000 spectators. Since it first played host to Formula 1 in 1999, the Sepang Circuit has become one of the most popular circuits among the F1 drivers.

The course, covering an impressive 5.542km circuit, features 15 turns and 8 straights. The Petronas Malaysian F1 Grand Prix brings the world’s best drivers together on this circuit.

The Sultan Abdul Aziz Royal Gallery

The museum is a dedication of the ninth Sultan of Selangor, Sultan Sharafuddin Idris Shah, the present Selangor Sultan to honour his late father, Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Shah.

There are various royal collections depicting the reigning period of the late king, from his early childhood through his appointment as the eighth Sultan Selangor in 1960 and as the eleventh King in 1999.

Among the collections include replicas of Selangor’s crown jewels, royal seal of Sultan Sir Abdul Samad (fourth Selangor Sultan) and state sword decorated with silver and Burmese rubies used by the fifth Selangor Sultan.

Visit this unique and interesting gallery to discover more of the history of Selangor’s late illustrious Sultan and Malaysia’s eleventh King.

Zoo Negara

Zoo Negara (National Zoo) was officially opened by the country’s first prime minister, Tunku Abdul Rahman on 14 November, 1963.

At the time, entrance rate was 50 cents for adults and 20 cents for children.

Among the attractions at the zoo include Akuarium Negara opened in 1972 and in 1984 renamed Akuarium Tunku Abdul Rahman, Bird house, Reptile House, Ape Centre, Savannah Walk, and Mammal Kingdom.

There is also Zoo Negara by night. Catch a glimpse of many animals who are at their most active at night.

There are more than 5137 animals from 459 species of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish.

Zoo Negara covers 110 acres of land which is situated only 5km from the city of Kuala Lumpur.

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